Foo-Foo Challenge – Day 17: Nanchatte Tonkotsu Ramen

Foo-Foo Tei’s best selling ramen is finally here! You might remember it from my “A Night at Foo-Foo Tei” post last month, but today we are in for another surprise. The Nanchatte Tonkotsu Ramen is a creamy tofu-based dream that reflects Murakami-san’s jolly sense of humor. It’s the fourth and final original soup base that he uses at Foo-Foo Tei with the others being shoyu, shio, and miso. Aside from the tofu, there are several key ingredients that make up this ramen and Murakami-san guards them with his life. I would love to tell you what they are, but I can’t. All I can give you is a hint: 83. Nanchatte…


Healthy tonkotsu may sound like an oxymoron, but then again this really isn’t tonkotsu. There’s no pork in this soup so you don’t have to worry about it weighing you down. Unless of course, you beef it up with a porky surprise…


KOKUDAMA!!! After falling in love with the Kokudama Shoyu 4 days ago, I had this crazy idea of adding it to the Nanchatte. Murakami-san agreed to let me try it and I couldn’t wait! Doesn’t the pic below just make you drool?


And as you can see from the following pic, the Kokudama gives the Nanchatte a true tonkotsu look and feel. It’s like adding makeup to a rubber mask. The flavor was nice too. Not as mind-blowing as the Kokudama Shoyu, but the sweetness of the Nanchatte tangoed with the Kokudama’s boldness. I think two spoonfuls, instead of one, might be better next time. The ground pork really impresses.


I ordered the Saba Shio-yaki today because I’ve practically seen 90% of customers order it every day that I’ve been here. It was time to see for myself what all the fuss was about. Easily the most popular appetizer by my own observations, the Saba did not disappoint. Murakami-san is a gurume guru!


After I finished my ramen, Murakami-san brought me my usual post-ramen beer…and then he disappeared. He returned with what he called his version of “Summer Sausage,” which you won’t find on the menu. Initially cooked in vinegar then preserved for a few days, Murakami-san stir-fry’s it with a really HOT chili sauce when it’s ready to serve. A great companion to my beer; I think I’ll call them Summer Sausage Balls of Fire.


And then he disappeared again. Two times in one night–sweet! This time he brought out some chicken wings and when I asked him what it was called, he replied “chikin winguzu” with his Japanese accent. Haha, very funny but I guess you had to be there. Their real name is “Pari Pari Chicken.” It gets its name from the sound it makes when you crunch through them bones and all. Yes I did just say that you can eat the bones too, if you like. This chicken is first fried in a very low temperature oil that cooks them thoroughly. Then they are cooled down and stored in the fridge until ready to serve. Right before serving, they are fried a second time using a very high temperature–this is what gives the bones a potato-chip-like texture. Seasoned with salt & pepper, these chikin winguzu’s are perfect for a night of drinking.


Tomorrow’s ramen: Kamo Negi (Duck & Green Onion)

3 Replies to “Foo-Foo Challenge – Day 17: Nanchatte Tonkotsu Ramen”

  1. @Exile Kiss: The waitress said I missed you by an hour tonight. Zannen. I really hope you can try the new creations soon!@edjusted: Thx! I was trying to stay within the spirit of Halloween…haha.

  2. Hi Keizo,Ooh! The Pari Pari Chicken looks really good! Thanks for sharing another pics of another new creation.Now I can only hope Murakami-san adds all these new creations to the menu soon so we can all try! (^_~) (3G Chicken, Pari Pari, Kokudama, Chawanmushi…) Urayamashii~! (^_~)

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